Side effects of turmeric (a guide)

Today, we are going to see the side effects of turmeric.

Turmeric is an excellent health spice and has exceptional health benefits. However, in some cases, and like all herbal medicine, it can cause certain unwanted harmful effects, which is why it is important to know what these harmful effects are and when can they occur before consuming them.

If you are not one of the cases below, then you can buy quality turmeric without hesitation!

Side effects of turmeric

The dangers: a question of dosage
It should be understood that it all depends on the dosage. Turmeric is consumed in the form of capsules, tablets, dietary supplement, spices, dried roots, fresh roots, and each form of turmeric has a different concentration of curcumin.

The powder, the dried and fresh roots are generally for food use, and, apart from the contraindications and possible drug interactions mentioned below, they do not present any danger.

It is especially capsules, tablets and food supplements that can pose a problem if they are highly dosed. In this method of taking, it is always necessary to refer to the instructions for use and a medical opinion.

What are the contraindications for turmeric?

As a precaution, turmeric is contraindicated in people:

•suffering from obstructions and  gallstones
•suffering from liver disease
showing signs of allergy to this plant (rashes, pimples, etc.)
•having medical intervention or tooth extraction within 15 days
These people should take advice from their doctor before taking turmeric, food or therapy.

If you suffer from stomach ulcer or duodenum, avoid consuming turmeric in high dose as it may increase irritation. At a food dose, this does not stop a problem.

What are the side effects of turmeric?

Side effects of turmeric are rare or nonexistent. According to medical research, the effect of fresh turmeric and turmeric powder in the diet is safe, if chosen correctly (quality, without pesticides or additives, etc.): At dietary dose, it, therefore, does not pose a problem.

However, high dose turmeric can cause some side effects, but without serious consequences, if there is no allergy.

Side effects of turmeric

The most common adverse effects are:

•dry mouth
•bloating and gas
•a warming effect which may be unpleasant for women who are menopausal or prone to hot flashes.
•possible heartburn at very high doses.
•A real overdose can lead to nausea and vomiting.

Turmeric during pregnancy and lactation

As a precautionary principle, the European Medicines Agency recommends not to take turmeric during pregnancy or breastfeeding, except for food use. So there is no problem in putting a little turmeric in the food, but no cure.

Why? Because turmeric is used to treat missed periods and to help eliminate stagnant blood, moreover, in large amounts, it could stimulate contractions of the uterus.

Likely interactions between turmeric and medications

Anticoagulants

Turmeric has anticoagulant properties, so its consumption, food and therapy, associated with anticoagulant or antiplatelet treatment, must be done with the informed advice of a doctor.

Indeed, the anticoagulant effects of turmeric will increase the thinning effects of drugs, which can have serious consequences (bleeding, haemorrhaging, bruising, etc.).

Studies have shown that turmeric may be as effective as atorvastatin, a blood thinner prescribed for its cholesterol-lowering effect.

Among the most common anticoagulant and antiplatelet drugs are aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), clopidogrel (Plavix), dipyridamole (Persantine), AVK (anti-vitamin K), ticlopidine (Ticlid), warfarin (Coumadin) ), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, etc.

Be careful, it is not only drugs that can be anticoagulants, some plants or spices can also have the same properties, among the most common: garlic, ginger, ginkgo, ginseng, tonka beans, etc.

Antacids

Antacids are used to decrease stomach acidity, and less often, to heal peptic ulcers.

Turmeric may inhibit the action of antacids and cause some side effects such as bloating, gas, chest pain, nausea, and stomach cramps. The combination could even have the opposite effects of antacids, that is to say, increase acid secretion.

This is especially the case in people who suffer from gastroesophageal reflux disease.

The most common antacids are cimetidine (Tagamet), famotidine (Pepcid), ranitidine (Zantac), Raniplex, Nizaxi, Omeprazole, Maalox, Rocgel, Xolaam, etc.

Antidiabetics

Turmeric has anti-diabetic properties, so by combining the spice with taking anti-diabetic drugs, their effects are increased, and this can lead to side effects such as hypoglycemia, excessive sweating, tremors, visual disturbances, dizziness, anxiety, etc.

Among the most common antidiabetics are biguanides, sulfonylureas, meglitinides, thiazolidinediones, DPP-4 inhibitors, SGLT2 inhibitors, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, bile acid sequestrants. , etc.

Anti-inflammatory drugs

Among all the properties of turmeric, we find its anti-inflammatory virtues, which is also often why it is consumed, so if you take anti-inflammatory drugs, then it can cause an overdose and cause certain undesirable effects.

Indeed, turmeric would be as effective as paracetamol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, to relieve any type of inflammation, especially for osteoarthritis, ulcerative colitis, etc.

However, there are studies, including an Italian study, which showed that the combination of turmeric with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory treatment, allowed faster healing. However, if you fall into this category, ask your doctor for advice before taking turmeric.

To conclude, it is always important to remember that just because a product is natural, it doesn’t mean you can do anything. The effects of spices are very real and effective, which is why you must take precautions and inform yourself before embarking on a cure.

Remember that food use, except in the event of drug interaction or proven contraindication, does not pose a problem.

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